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INTRODUCTION

Chapter 1.     COMTES de LUXEMBOURG 963-1136

SIEGFRIED [963]-998, HEINRICH I 998-1026
HEINRICH II 1026-1047, GISELBERT 1047-[1059]
KONRAD I [1059]-1086, HENRI III 1086-1095, GUILLAUME I 1096-[1129], KONRAD II [1129]-1136

Chapter 2.     COMTES de LUXEMBOURG (NAMUR)

HENRI IV 1136-1196, ERMENSENDE 1198-1247

Chapter 3.     COMTES de LUXEMBOURG 1237-1313 (LIMBURG-ARLON)

HENRI V 1237-1281
HENRI VI 1281-1288
HENRI VII 1288-1313
JEAN 1313-1346, CHARLES 1346-1353, WENZEL I 1353-1383, WENZEL II 1383-1419, [JOBST 1388-1402, ELISABETH 1411-1441], SIGISMOND 1419-1437

 

 

INTRODUCTION

Count Siegfried, the question of whose uncertain ancestry is discussed below, acquired the castle of Luxembourg from the church of St Maximin at Trier in 963.  At that time, the suzerain of the castle was Frédéric Duke of Upper Lotharingia, who is recorded in the charter as giving his approval to the acquisition[1].  The duke of Lower Lotharingia was recorded as suzerain of the county of Luxembourg after the confirmation of the formation of that duchy in 1012[2].  The descendants in the male line of Count Siegfried continued to rule Luxembourg until 1136, when Count Konrad II died (see Chapter 1).  The Luxembourg family achieved a significant increase in influence and power following the marriage in 1000 of Siegfried's daughter Kunigunde to Heinrich IV Duke of Bavaria, who was elected as Heinrich II King of Germany in 1002 and crowned emperor in 1014.  Kunigunde's brother Heinrich was installed as duke of Bavaria in 1004, although his relations with his brother-in-law the king were far from smooth and he was deprived of the duchy a few years later.  He was reappointed duke in 1017, but lost the title again after King Heinrich died in 1024, although his nephew Heinrich ruled as duke of Bavaria in 1042 until he was murdered in 1047.  Another family achievement was the election in 1081 of Hermann Graf von Salm, nephew of the second duke Heinrich, as king of Germany in opposition to King Heinrich IV, although he appears to have been chosen because of his obscurity and lack of influence rather than his own personal qualities. 

When Konrad II died in 1136, he was succeeded as Comte de Luxembourg by his first cousin Henri de Namur (see Chapter 2), the son of Konrad's paternal aunt Ermensende.  The reason for the exclusion from the succession to the county of Konrad's own son and his nephews has not yet been identified.  Another younger branch of the original Luxembourg family continued to rule as Grafen von Salm (see LOWER LOTHARINGIAN NOBILITY, extinct in the male line in 1784) and Seigneurs de Blâmont (extinct 1503) but made little impact on the European political scene.  Comte Henri de Namur was succeeded by his daughter Ermensende, who transmitted the county of Luxembourg to Hendrik van Limburg, her son by her second marriage to Waleran IV Duke of Limburg (see Chapter 3). 

By the late 13th century, imperial influence had declined considerably in the western part of the kingdom of Germany[3].  Luxembourg had emerged as one of the largest German states, bound to the north by the county of Namur and the bishopric of Liège, to the west by France, to the south by the duchy of Lorraine and the county of Bar, and to the east by the archbishopric of Trier.  Although Luxembourg was a German state whose population spoke a German dialect, its rulers frequently intermarried with French and Walloon aristocracy.  Contacts with France increased after Henri de Namur inherited the county in 1136.  By the early 13th century, French was replacing Latin as the language of charters and became the language spoken at the Luxembourg court. 

In 1294, Count Henri VII became a French vassal, although he did not break his ties with the empire[4].  Nor did this prevent his election as king of Germany in 1308.  The new king had little territorial influence in Germany outside his own county.  In order to increase his power, he arranged the marriage of his son Jean to the heiress of the kingdom of Bohemia in 1310.  The Luxembourg monarchs continued centre-stage in European politics for more than a hundred years, during which time they also succeeded as kings of Hungary and Markgrafen of Brandenburg. 

After the death of Emperor Sigmund in 1437, Luxembourg was inherited by his son-in-law Albrecht II Duke of Austria.  On the death of the latter in 1439, the territory passed to Duke Albrecht's daughter Anna and her husband Wilhelm Duke of Saxony.  However, their accession was challenged by Philippe Duke of Burgundy.  The Burgundian claim was based on the transfer in 1409 by Emperor Wenzel (Emperor Sigmund's older brother) of a mortgage over Luxembourg to Elisabeth Herzogin von Görlitz, the daughter of Wenzel and Sigmund's deceased younger brother Johann Markgraf von Brandenburg.  The representatives of Luxembourg, except the nobility, acknowledged Elisabeth and her husband as their "mortgage rulers/souverains engagistes" at Arlon in 1410 and the couple took possession of the county in 1412.  Elisabeth's uncle Sigmund forbade Luxembourg from paying homage to her, but he was forced to confirm her position when he was unable to redeem the pledge after he inherited the county from his brother Wenzel in 1419.  Elisabeth sold her rights as engagiste to Philippe Duke of Burgundy in 1441.  Burgundian forces captured Luxembourg in 1443, and Wilhelm Duke of Saxony sold his claim for 120,000 Hungarian gulden.  Luxembourg was acknowledged as Burgundian territory, and in 1444 was united with the other provinces of the Low Countries as an administrative entity under Burgundian rule[5].  After the death of Duchess Elisabeth in 1451, Ladislas, posthumous son of Albrecht V Duke of Austria, claimed Luxembourg as the direct heir of Emperor Sigmund, and his troops occupied parts of the duchy.  Ladislas opened negotiations with Charles VII King of France to sell his rights to Luxembourg, the arrangement being confirmed by his betrothal to the king's daughter, but he died in 1457 before a final settlement was reached.  From that time Burgundian rule was unchallenged, and Luxembourg became part of the territories which eventually passed into the hands of the Habsburg dynasty as a result of the marriage in 1477 of Marie, daughter and heiress of the last Valois duke of Burgundy, to Archduke Maximilian. 

Governors of Luxembourg were appointed by the rulers of Burgundy: these were, in chronological order, Robert de Virnenburg, Corneille bâtard de Bourgogne, Antoine Prince de Chimay et Croÿ, Charles Comte de Charolais (later Duke of Burgundy), Rudolf Markgraf von Hochberg, Everard de la Marck Seigneur d'Arenberg, Claude de Neufchâtel, Christoph Markgraf von Baden, and Bernhard Markgraf von Baden[6]

 

 

Chapter 1.    COMTES de LUXEMBOURG 963-1136

SIEGFRIED [963]-998, HEINRICH I 998-1026

SIEGFRIED, son of --- & his wife [Kunigund ---] (-28 Oct [998], bur Trier).  The precise origin of Siegfried Count of Luxembourg is unknown but it is probable that he was related to Wigerich [III].  Gerbert of Aurillac refers to "Godefridum, patruumque eius Sigifridum" in a letter dated 985 addressed to "dominæ Teuphanu Imperatrice" after he visited the pair in prison following their unsuccessful defence of Verdun against Lothaire King of the Franks[7], other letters clarifying that "Godefridum" was Godefroi Comte de Verdun, grandson of Wigerich [III].  It is unlikely that patruus can be interpreted in this source in its strict sense of paternal uncle.  Wigerich [III] died in [916/19], while it is more probable that Siegfried was born in the range [930/40] given the birth of his eldest son not long before 964 and Siegfried's own death at the close of the 10th century.  Another indication that Siegfried was probably not the son of Wigerich is his absence from a charter dated 943, issued by the widow of Wigerich's son Gozelon, which is subscribed by the latter's three known lay brothers[8].  Another possibility is that Siegfried was the son of Kunigund, wife of Wigerich [III], by her second husband Richwin.  However, in this hypothesis he could not have been born later than [923/24] in light of Richwin's date of death, which is also inconsistent with Siegfried's likely birth date range.  Assuming that patruus indicates an agnatic relationship, the most likely possibility is that Siegfried was the first cousin of Godefroi's father, the son of a brother of Wigerich [III].  Otto I King of Germany transferred the convent of Echternach to Siegfried "advocatus altaris" in [949/50], although the charter relating to this grant has not yet been identified.  Siegfried also owned scattered properties in Feulen, Hosingen and Monnerich (in the pagus Wabrensis) and at Berncastel and Roussy (in the pagus Mosellanus)[9]Comte [de Luxembourg].  "Sigefridus comes de nobili genere natus" received the castle of Luxembourg from St Maximin, Trier in exchange for property "villa Feulen in comitatu Giselberti comitis in pago Arduenne in villa…Viulna [et]…in pago Mathingouui in comitatu Godefridi comitis super ripem Alsuntie fluminis" by charter dated 17 Apr 963[10].  Gade reproduces a photographic copy of the original charter[11].  Vogt of Echternach from 973: "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property to Kloster Echternach by charter dated 15 Mar 973 which names "comitis Sigifridi fidelis nostri"[12].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier: Archbishop Egbert donated property "de beneficio Luthardi comitis…mortuo sine herede" to Trier St Paul by charter dated 981, subscribed by "…Sigefridi comitis et rerum S Maximini advocatis…"[13].  He captured Wicfred Bishop of Verdun, who had attacked Siegfried's territory, at Vandresel but released him in [984].  Richer records that "Belgicæ dux Theodericus, necnon et vir nobilis ac strenuous Godefridus, Sigefridus quoque vir illustris, Bardo etiam et Gozilo fratres clarissimi et nominatissimi" captured Verdun in 985[14].  He helped defend Verdun against Lothaire King of the West Franks in [984/85], but was captured together with Godefroi Comte de Verdun [Wigeriche][15].  According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Sigefridus Kunuz comes, pater Chunigundis imperatricis, obiit V Kal Novembrisi"[16].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "V Kal Nov" of "Sigefridus Kunuz pater Chunigundis imperatricis"[17].  The necrology of Gorze records the death "VI Kal Nov" of "Seifredus comes"[18].  The year of Siegfried´s death is uncertain. 

m (before 963) HEDWIG, daughter of --- (-13 Dec after 993).  "Sygefridus comes" reached an agreement with Heinrich Archbishop of Trier by charter dated 17 Sep 964 which names "coniunx mea Hadewige, filiusque noster Henricus"[19].  "Sigifridus comes…cum coniuge mea Hadewihe" donated property "in valle Alsunciensi in villa Marics in comitatu Ardenensi regimini filii nostri Heinrici comitis subiacenti" to St Maximin, Trier by charter dated 993[20].  According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "domina Hedewich comitissa, mater Chunigundis imperatricis, obiit Idus Decembris"[21].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "Id Dec" of "Hedewich com mater Chunigundis imperatricis Papie occisus"[22]

Siegfried & his wife had twelve children: 

1.             HEINRICH (before 17 Sep 964-27 Feb 1026).  "Sygefridus comes" reached an agreement with Heinrich Archbishop of Trier by charter dated 17 Sep 964 which names "coniunx mea Hadewige, filiusque noster Henricus"[23].  The likely chronology of the other members of this family suggests that Heinrich must have been an infant at that time.  The Annalista Saxo names "Teoderici Metensi episcopi et Heinrich postmodum ducis Bawarici" as brothers of "domnam Cunigundam, felicis memorie virginem", wife of Emperor Heinrich II[24]Comte [de Luxembourg].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier.  His brother-in-law Heinrich II King of Germany appointed him in 1004 as HEINRICH V Duke of Bavaria but resumed the title himself in 1009.  Herimannus names "Theoderico Metense episcopo et Heinrico Baioriæ duce Fridericoque comite" as brothers of "Adalbero clericus, reginæ Cunigundis germanus", when recording their rebellion against Emperor Heinrich II and the deprival of Heinrich's title of duke of Bavaria in 1008[25].  According to Gade, the confiscation was due to a dispute over the archbishopric of Trier to which Duke Heinrich was manoeuvring to appoint his brother Adalbert, in opposition to King Heinrich who feared that too much power would accrue to the Luxembourg family[26].  Graf von Bidgau: "Everbero ex nobili prosapia origen" donated property "in pago Bitgouuensi in comitatu Henrici ducis in villa…Frenkinka" to St Maximin, at the request of "fratris sui…Wazonis qui monastica religione…est", by charter dated in the compilation to [993], but presumably dateable to after 1004 as Heinrich is given the ducal title[27].  Henri was reappointed duke of Bavaria in 1017, but lost the title after the death of Emperor Heinrich II in 1024.  Thietmar records that "the empress…enthroned her brother Heinrich as duke of Bavaria" in 1018[28].  As "Hezzilo Duke of Bavaria", brother of Empress Kunigunde, he is recorded as the latter's adviser in Wipo's description of the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024[29].  He lost the title after the election of King Konrad II in 1024.  The Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ records the death in 1026 of "Heinricus dux Bavarie frater sancte Chunigundis"[30].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "III Kal Mar" of "Heinricus dux frater Chunigundis imperatricis"[31]

2.             LIUTGARD (-14 May after 1005, bur Egmond).  Thietmar names "the queen's sister Liudgard", recording that "the king attacked the Frisians with a fleet…to placate [her] fury", dated to [May/Jun] 1005 from the context of the text[32].  The Annales Egmundani name "Lutgarda comitissa" as wife of "Arnulphus comes tertius [Hollandensium]" but do not give her origin, specifying in a later passage that they were "legally" betrothed in 980 at "coram rege Ottone"[33].  Her origin is confirmed by the necrology of Ranshofen which records the death "III Id May" of "Liukart com soror Chunigundis imperatricis"[34].  Her betrothal date suggests that she was one of Siegfried's older children.  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death "II Id Mai" of "Lutgardis…sua collateralis" and her burial at Egmond[35].  Beke's Egmondsch Necrologium records the death "pridie Id Mai" of "Lutgairdis uxor eius [Arnulfi comitis] filia regis Grecorum"[36].  According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Liukart comitissa, soror Chunigundis imperatricis, obiit II Non Iulii"[37], but this date is inconsistent with other primary sources.  m (980) ARNULF Count of Holland, son of DIRK II Count of Holland & his wife Hildegarde [de Flandre] ([950]-killed in battle Winckel 18 Sep 993, bur Egmond). 

3.             SIEGFRIED .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  985. 

4.             FRIEDRICH (-6 Oct 1019).  Herimannus names "Theoderico Metense episcopo et Heinrico Baioriæ duce Fridericoque comite" as brothers of "Adalbero clericus, reginæ Cunigundis germanus", when recording their rebellion against Emperor Heinrich II in 1008[38]. (below)

5.             DIETRICH [Theoderic] (-2 May 1047).  The Annalista Saxo names "Teoderici Metensi episcopi et Heinrich postmodum ducis Bawarici" as brothers of "domnam Cunigundam, felicis memorie virginem", wife of Emperor Heinrich II[39]Herimannus names "Theoderico Metense episcopo et Heinrico Baioriæ duce Fridericoque comite" as brothers of "Adalbero clericus, reginæ Cunigundis germanus", when recording their rebellion against Emperor Heinrich II in 1008[40].  Bishop of Metz 1006-1047.  As "Theodoric Bishop of Metz", brother of Empress Kunigunde, he is recorded as the latter's adviser in Wipo's description of the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024[41].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "VI Non May" of "Theodericus Metensis eps frater Chunigundis imperatricis et Ermindrud abba soror eius"[42]

6.             KUNIGUNDE (-Kaufungen 3 Mar 1033[43], bur Bamberg Cathedral).  The Annalista Saxo names "domnam Cunigundam, felicis memorie virginem" as wife of Emperor Heinrich II, specifying that she was sister of "Teoderici Metensi episcopi et Heinrich postmodum ducis Bawarici"[44].  Rodulfus Glaber refers to the wife of Emperor Heinrich as "filiam Siefredi Saxonum ducis"[45].  No direct indication of the date of Kunigunde's marriage has been found apart from Thietmar's references to her which show that the couple was already married when her husband was elected king[46].  She founded Kaufungen convent in 1017.  The Annales Herbipolenses minores record the death in 1038 (maybe a transcription error for 1033 rather than a date error) of "sancta Kunegundis imperatoris" and her burial at Bamberg[47].  The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "V Non Mar" of "Chunigunt imperatrix"[48].  She was canonised 29 Mar 1200, feast day 3 Mar[49]m (early Summer 1000) HEINRICH IV Duke of Bavaria, son of HEINRICH II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria & his wife Gisela of Upper Burgundy (-Pfalz Grona 13 Jul 1024, bur Bamberg Cathedral).  He was elected HEINRICH II "der Heilige" King of Germany at Mainz 7 Jun 1002, crowned at Aachen 8 Sep 1002, crowned Emperor at Rome 14 Feb 1014. 

7.             [50]ALBERADA (-1040 or after).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 

8.             GISELBERT (-killed in battle Pavia 18 May 1004).  Thietmar names a "youth…Giselbert, the queen's brother", recording his death in battle outside Pavia[51].  The epithet suggests that Giselbert must have been one of the younger children of Siegfried, although no other corroboration for this has been found.  "Domna Berta, viri illustris Volcmari comitis relicta" donated property "in pago Moselensi in comitatu Waldeleuinga cui Gisilbertus comes…villa Mudenfert" to St Maximin, Trier by charter dated 996 witnessed by "Friderich comes"[52].  The necrology of Merseburg records the death "18 May" of "Gisilbertus frater imperatricis Chunigunde"[53].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "XV Kal Jun" of "Gisilbertus frater Chunigundis imperatricis Papie occisus"[54]

9.             ADALBERO (-after 1037).  Herimannus names "Adalbero clericus, reginæ Cunigundis germanus" when recording his appointment as provost at Trier[55].  Thietmar records the election in 1008 of "Adalbero…the queen's brother and still an immature youth" as Archbishop of Trier to succeed Liudolf who died 6/7 Apr 1008 and the cancellation of the election by his brother-in-law King Heinrich II[56], which triggered his rebellion against the king55.  The Vita Meinwerci names "Athelbero præpositus monasterii sancti Paulini Treveris" and "soror eius Cunigunda [regina]" in a paragraph dated 1017[57].  Provost of St Paul in Trier.  "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis, dominus de Ruscheio, de Serico, de Sarburch et de Berincastel" left a testament dated 12 Nov 1036, witnessed by "Godefrido duce, Gerardo comite, Arnolfo comite, Bertholfo comite, Friderico comite eiusque fratribus, Gisilberto et Theoderico, Hartmanno comite…"[58].  Another testament dated 1037 of "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis" is witnessed by "Adelberti avunculi nostri marchionis et ducis Lothoringie et Iuditte amicte nostre uxoris sue"[59]

10.         EVA (-19 Apr after 18 Jun 1040).  "Comes Gerardo cum consensu suæ conjugis Evæ" donated property "in villa Goduncort in pago Solicensi" to St Michael's church in Moros in Lombardy "pro anima filii sui Sigifredi defuncti" by charter dated 3 Feb 1020[60].  Her parentage is deduced from Thietmar naming her son Siegfried, son of Count Gerhard, "the empress's nephew"[61].  This is confirmed by "Henricus…rex" granting property "in villa Morlinga in pago Musiligeauue in comitatu Uirad" to "Abenze…ex parte sue sororis contectalis Heinrici imperatoris" by charter dated 18 Jun 1040[62]m GERHARD Graf von Metz, son of [RICHARD Graf von Metz/GERHARD Graf von Metz] & his wife --- (-[28 Dec 1021/23]). 

11.         ERMENTRUDE (-2 May ----).  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "VI Non May" of "Theodericus Metensis eps frater Chunigundis imperatricis et Ermindrud abba soror eius"[63].  Abbess. 

12.         daughter .  Her parentage is proved by the necrology of Ranshofen which records the death "XIII Kal Oct" of "Abba Uta filia sororis Chunigundis imperatricis"[64]m THIETMAR, son of --- (-29 Mar ----).  According to the Preface of Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores, "Dietmarus, pater abbatisse Uotæ, obiit IV Kal Aprilisi"[65].  Vogt of St Maria an der Rosel, Coblenz castle.  "Rihdahc" denoted property to Kloster St Maria an der Rosel, in the castle of Coblenz, by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated [981/89], subscribed by "…Thietmari comitis et eiusdem monasterii advocati…"[66], although it is not certain that this refers to the same Graf Thietmar.  Graf Thietmar & his wife had one child: 

a)             ODA (-19 Sep after 1017).  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "XIII Kal Oct" of "Abba Uta filia sororis Chunigundis imperatricis"[67].  "Outa…consanguinea imperatricis" is named first abbess of the convent of Kaufungen, founded in 1017 by Empress Kunigund[68]

 

 

Possible niece of Empress Kunigund, the identity of her parents is not known:

1.             HEMMA .  "Hemma…nostræ neptis" is named as mother of "Willihelmo comitis" to whom "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" granted property "inter fluenta Souuue et Soune, Zotle et Nirine in pago Seuna" by charter dated 15 Apr 1016[69].  The precise relationship between Hemma and Emperor Heinrich II is not known.  An interesting speculation is suggested by the necrology of Traunkirchen which records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Chunigundis regina fundatrix no ecclesie"[70].  If Hemma was the niece of Queen Kunigund, and died young, it is possible that the Queen founded the monastery in her memory, associating Hemma's husband in the foundation (together with his new wife).  m as his first wife, WILHELM [III] Graf, son of [WILHELM [II] Graf & his wife ---] (-29 Sep [1010]). 

 

HEINRICH II 1026-1047, GISELBERT 1047-[1059]

FRIEDRICH, son of SIEGFRIED Comte [de Luxembourg] & his wife Hedwig --- (-6 Oct 1019).  "Domna Berta, viri illustris Volcmari comitis relicta" donated property "in pago Moselensi in comitatu Waldeleuinga cui Gisilbertus comes…villa Mudenfert" to St Maximin, Trier by charter dated 996 witnessed by "Friderich comes"[71]Herimannus names "Theoderico Metense episcopo et Heinrico Baioriæ duce Fridericoque comite" as brothers of "Adalbero clericus, reginæ Cunigundis germanus", when recording their rebellion against Emperor Heinrich II in 1008[72].  He is named "Fridericus, frater Cunigundæ imperatricis" when his death in 1019 is recorded[73].  Graf im Moselgau.  Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy. 

m --- [von Hammerstein] heiress of Gleiberg, daughter of HERIBERT Graf im Kinziggau Pfalzgraf [Konradiner] & his wife Imiza --- (-after 985).  The parentage of the wife of Graf Friedrich is suggested by the Vita Adelheidis which names "Irminthrudis, Alverad [et] Berthrada" as the three sisters of Adelheid, daughters of "Megengoz" & his wife, specifying that Irminthrudis was grandmother of "Heinrici magnifici ducis et Adhelberonis Metensis episcopi, Friderici ducis"[74], although the primary source which confirms the name of her father has not yet been identified. 

Graf Friedrich & his wife had ten children: 

1.             HEINRICH (-murdered 14 Oct 1047, bur Trier St Maximin).  Although the necrology of Ranshofen records that Heinrich was the son of Empress Kunigund´s brother[75], the primary source which confirms the name of his father has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his uncle as Comte [de Luxembourg] in 1026 as well as in his other properties in Moselgau and Bidgau[76].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier.  He was installed in 1042 as HEINRICH VII Duke of Bavaria by Heinrich III King of Germany.  The Annales Necrologici Fuldenses record the death in 1047 of "Henrichus dux"[77].  The Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ records the death in 1048 of "Heinricus dux Bavarie filium fratris sancte Chunigundis" in his 23rd year as duke "a suis consiliaris strangulator"[78].  The necrology of Ranshofen records the death "II Id Oct" of "Henricus filius fratris Chunigundis imperatricis"[79]

2.             FRIEDRICH (-28 Aug 1065, bur Stablo).  The Vita Adelheidis names "Heinrici magnifici ducis et Adhelberonis Metensis episcopi, Friderici ducis fratrumque suorum" as grandsons of "Irminthrudis", daughter of Megingoz[80].  "…Friderico comite eiusque fratribus, Gisilberto et Theoderico…" were among the witnesses of the testament dated 12 Nov 1036 left by "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis, dominus de Ruscheio, de Serico, de Sarburch et de Berincastel", who was their paternal uncle[81].  The primary source which confirms that Friedrich was the father of the three brothers has not yet been identified.  He was installed by Heinrich III King of Germany as FREDERIC Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1046.  Vogt of Stablo and Malmédy.  m firstly GERBERGE de Boulogne, daughter of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain (-before 1059, bur Abbey of Stablo).  The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Gerbergam, Friderici ducis uxorem" as daughter of "Mathildis filia Gerberge"[82]m secondly as her first husband, IDA of Saxony heiress of Laroche in the Ardennes, daughter of BERNHARD II Duke in Saxony [Billung] & his wife Eilika von Schweinfurt (-31 Jul 1102, bur Namur).  "Ida" is named as wife of "Albertus comes Namucensis" in the Chronicon Sancti Huberti, which specifies that "prius fuerat uxor ducis Frederici", but her origin is not given[83].  The Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Idam Namucensem…uxorem Angelberti marchionis et Gertrudem comitissam Flandrensem" as children of "Bernardum"[84].  She married secondly ([1065/66]) Albert III Comte de Namur.  Friedrich & his first wife had one child:

a)             JUDITH .  The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Iuttam" as daughter of "Friderici ducis" and his wife Mathilde (presumably an error for Gerberge), naming her son "Henricum de Lemburc"[85], although it appears from other sources that Hendrik was Judith's son-in-law not son.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that the dowry of Waleran's wife was "dominium ultra Mosam prope Leodium"[86]m WALERAN [II] Comte d'Arlon, son of WALERAN [I] Comte d'Arlon & his wife ---(-1081). 

3.             ADALBERO (-13 Nov 1072, bur Metz Saint-Sauveur).  The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records that, after the death of "domnus Theodericus secundus huius nominis, Metensis episcopus" in 1048 "Adelbero eius consanguineus, nepos Adelberonis tercii huius nominis ex fratre Theoderico duce Lotharingie seu Mosellorum" succeeded as Bishop of Metz[87], although the precise meaning of this passage is unclear.  A later passage names "Adelberonis Metensis episcoporum" as brother of "Theoderico duce Lotharingie seu Mosellanorum" specifying that he was installed in 1060 as advocatus of St Trudo, the following passage naming "Fredericum ducem" so clarifying that the earlier reference was a mistake for Friedrich[88].  Bishop of Metz 1047-1072. 

4.             GISELBERT (-14 Aug [1056/59]).  "…Friderico comite eiusque fratribus, Gisilberto et Theoderico…" were among the witnesses of the testament dated 12 Nov 1036 left by "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis, dominus de Ruscheio, de Serico, de Sarburch et de Berincastel", who was their paternal uncle[89].  The primary source which confirms that Friedrich was the father of the three brothers has not yet been identified.  Graf von Salm 1036.  An exchange of property between the abbeys of St Maximin and Malmédy by charter dated 1035 is witnessed by "comes Gislebertus de Salmo"[90].  Gade speculates that Giselbert obtained the stronghold of Salm by marriage[91].  Referred to as "comes de castello Lucelinburg" and "Gilbertus Luceburgenses comes", he succeeded his brother in 1047 as Comte de [Luxembourg].  He was "a wild, warlike man who seized every opportunity to increase his power".  He seized land from the abbeys of Echternach and St Maximin, in the district of Köln and from the Poppo Archbishop of Trier[92].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier and of Echternach.  He was killed in an uprising in Italy[93]m ---.  The name of Giselbert's wife is not known.  However, as noted above, Gade speculates that Giselbert obtained the stronghold of Salm through his marriage[94].  Giselbert & his wife had six children: 

a)             KONRAD von Salm (-in Palestine 8 Aug 1086, bur Luxembourg Münster Abbey).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitis Conradis" as son of "Gislebertus comes de Luscelenburch"[95].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier and of Stablo.   (below)

b)             ADALBERO von Salm (-Antioch 1097).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Primicerius at Metz. 

c)             HERMANN von Salm (-killed in battle 28 Sep 1088, bur Metz).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Salm.  He was elected as HERMANN King of Germany in 1081.     

-        GRAFEN von SALM

d)             [JUDITH von Salm .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  It is possible that there is confusion with Judith, daughter of Friedrich de Luxembourg Duke of Lower Lotharingia, whose marriage to Waleran [II] Comte d'Arlon is attested in primary sources (see above), and that Waleran [II] and "[Udo] van Limburg" were in fact the same person.  m [UDO] van Limburg, son of ---.  1061.] 

e)             daughter .  The Annalista Saxo records "sororis Herimanni regis" as mother of "Theodericus", but does not name her husband[96]m ---, son of ---. 

f)               daughter .  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m KUNO Graf von Oltingen, son of BUCCO Graf von Oltingen & his wife ---.  1080/89. 

5.             DIETRICH .  "…Friderico comite eiusque fratribus, Gisilberto et Theoderico…" were among the witnesses of the testament dated 12 Nov 1036 left by "Adalbero…prepositus S Paulini Treuerensis, dominus de Ruscheio, de Serico, de Sarburch et de Berincastel", who was their paternal uncle[97].  The primary source which confirms that Friedrich was the father of the three brothers has not yet been identified.  1012/57.  m ---.  The name of Dietrich's wife is not known.  Dietrich & his wife had three children: 

a)             DIETRICH (-1075).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf.  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier.  "Theoderici comitis, Henrici fratris eius…" subscribed the charter dated 29 Jan 1068 under which Udo Archbishop of Trier donated property to St Simeon[98]

b)             HEINRICH von Laach (-12 Apr 1095).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  "Theoderici comitis, Henrici fratris eius…" subscribed the charter dated 29 Jan 1068 under which Udo Archbishop of Trier donated property to St Simeon[99]HEINRICH Pfalzgraf von Lothringen 1085.  "Heinricus comes de Lacho" was one of the witnesses to the charter dated 1087 under which "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed a donation of property "in Traiecto quam comes Gerardus de Wassenbergen invaserat" to St Servatius, Maastricht[100], although he was not referred to in this document as "comes palatinus".  "Heinricus…comes palatinus Rheni et dominus de Lacu…uxore mei Adleide" founded the abbey of Laach by charter dated 1093 subscribed by "Sygefridus privignus meus…"[101].  The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records the death in 1095 of "Heinricus palatinus comes"[102]m as her third husband, ADELHEID von Weimar heiress of Orlamünde, widow firstly of ADALBERT II Graf von Ballenstedt, secondly of HERMANN Pfalzgraf von Lotharingen [Ezzonen], daughter of OTTO Graf von Weimar Markgraf of Meissen & his wife Adela de Louvain (-28 Mar 1100).  The Annalista Saxo names (in order) "Odam, Cunigundam, Adelheidam" as the three daughters of Markgraf Otto & his wife, specifying that Adelheid married "Adalberto comiti de Ballenstide"[103].  In a later passage, the Annalista Saxo records the death of "Adhela sive Adelheit palatine" in 1100 en route to Rome, repeating her parentage[104].  No other primary source has so far been identified which confirms her second and third marriages.  Heiress of Orlamünde. 

c)             POPPO (-1103 or after).  The Chronicon Hugonis names "clericum Trevirensem Popponem, fratrem Heinrici comitis palatini" when recording his installation as Bishop of Metz[105].  Bishop of Metz 1092/1103. 

6.             HERMANN (-after 1075).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1045/75.  [same person as …?[106]  HERMANN von Gleiberg (-Jan 1086).  He succeeded in 1061 as HERMANN I Pfalzgraf von Lothringen.  There may be confusion between this person, identified so far only in Grote[107], and Hermann II Pfalzgraf von Lothringen.  If he did exist, he ceased to be Pfalzgraf in 1064 when Hermann II succeeded.] 

7.             OGIVE (-21 Feb or 9 Mar 1030, bur Gent St Peter).  The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Gisleberti comitis Odgivam" as wife of "Balduinum Barbatum"[108], the marriage presumably being arranged by Emperor Heinrich II as part of the alliance negotiated in 1012.  Ogive is shown as daughter of Graf Friedrich in Europäische Stammtafeln[109].  There is no reference to Friedrich's older brother Giselbert having married and had children.  The chronology does not favour Ogive being the daughter of Giselbert, son of Friedrich.  It is therefore assumed that the reference to "Gisleberti comitis" is an error, although the primary source has not yet been identified which confirms that Friedrich was Ogive's father.  The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1030 of "Odgiva comitissa"[110].  The Memorial of "Odgiva…Balduino domino" records her death "IX Mar"[111]m ([1012]) as his first wife, BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders, son of ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders & his wife Rozala di Ivrea [Italy] ([980]-30 May 1035). 

8.             GISELA (-21 May ----).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  1056/58.  The Memorial of "femina Gisla" records her death "Iunii XII ante Kal"[112]m RUDOLF van Gent [Aalst], son of ---.  [1031/34]-1052. 

9.             IRMTRUD [Imiza] (-after 2 Aug 1055, bur Altomünster).  The Genealogia Welforum names "Salice---de Glizperch Imizam nomine, Heinrici Noricorum ducis sororem et Friderici ducis Lotharingorum et Alberonis Metensis episcopi" as wife of Welf, specifying that her dowry was "villam Moringen et Elisinam curtem in Longobardia"[113].  Jordan suggests that the land in Lombardy was probably near Este[114].  m ([1015]) WELF [II] Graf von Altdorf, son of RUDOLF Graf von Altdorf & his wife Ita von Öhningen [Konradiner] (-10 Mar 1030, bur Altdorf). 

10.         UDA .  The Fundatio Ecclesiæ Sancti Georgii Lunarensis names "nobilis domina Uda" as sister of "domini Alberonis Metensi episcopi"[115].  Canoness at Remiremont 1080/1100.  Abbess of Saint-Rémy at Lunéville. 

 

KONRAD I [1059]-1086, HENRI III 1086-1095, GUILLAUME I 1096-[1129], KONRAD II [1129]-1136

KONRAD von Salm, son of GISELBERT Graf von Salm, Comte de Luxembourg & his wife --- (-in Palestine 8 Aug 1086, bur Luxembourg Münster Abbey).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitis Conradis" as son of "Gislebertus comes de Luscelenburch"[116].  Vogt of St Maximin at Trier and of Stablo.  He succeeded his father in [1056/59] as Comte [de Luxembourg].  He captured Eberhard Archbishop of Trier, for which he was excommunicated[117].  Konrad founded the Benedictine abbey of Münster [Altmünster] at Luxembourg in 1083[118].  He died while on the pilgrimage which had been required before his excommunication could be lifted[119].  He is referred to as "Comes de Luccilinburg" on the seals of Münster abbey, the first of his family to which this title was ascribed[120].  The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1086 of "Chonradus comes, frater Heremanni regis" while of pilgrimage to Jerusalem[121]

[m firstly ERMENSENDE, daughter of [ADALBERT Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his wife ---].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitissa de Longui et de Castris Ermensendis" as wife of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch"[122].  If Alberic correctly identifies the wife of Konrad as Ctss de Longwy et de Castres, it is likely that she was the daughter of Adalbert Duke of Lower Lotharingia who was also Comte de Longwy, but no primary source which confirms that this is correct has yet been found.  If it is correct, it is likely that Ermensende was Konrad's first wife and the mother of his daughter Ermensende, who is recorded as heiress of Longwy.] 

m [secondly] CLEMENCE [von Gleiberg], daughter of --- (-after 17 Jun 1129).  "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[123].  Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[124].  A second version of this charter, dated 1129, names "Clementia comitissa de Glizberc" and "Gerhardi mariti sui de Gelre", with the consent of "palatine comitisse Gertrudis"[125].  There may be confusion with Konrad´s mother, who is recorded as heiress of Gleiberg (see above).  Szabolcs de Vajay considers that this second document is a falsification[126]

Graf Konrad & his [first] wife had two children: 

1.             ERMENSENDE de Luxembourg (-26 Jun 1141).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensendis, specifying that Ermesinde was wife of "Namucensem…comitis Godefridi"[127].  Heiress of Luxembourg and Longwy.  "Ermensendis comitissa Namucensis" confirmed the prior donation of property to the church of Verdun Sainte-Vanne by "senioris mei comitis Alberti" by charter dated to [1124], subscribed by "domni mei Godefridi comitis et filii mei Henrici comitis, Hugonis filii Folmari comitis, Everardi filii Aiulfi comitis"[128].  Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[129].  In a charter dated 1139, "Albero…Leodiensium episcopus" notes a donation of property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire by "domna Ermensendis comitissa de Musalt, quæ uxor extitit…comitis Alberici" on the suggestion of "quadam nobili et religiosa fœmina nomine Regina, sibi enim consanguinea"[130], the original donation presumably being dated before [1109] when Ermesinde married her second husband.  It is likely that "Regina" in this charter was Regina von Oltingen, whose mother was first cousin to Ermesinde.  The necrology of Verdun Saint-Vanne records the death "VIII Kal Jun" of "Ermensendis comitissa Namucensis qui cum viro suo…comite Alberto cellam Montis Sancti Martini…confirmavit"[131]m firstly as his second wife, ALBERT [II] Graf von Dagsburg, son of [ALBERT [I] de Moha & his wife ---] (-24 Aug 1098).  m secondly ([1109]) as his second wife, GODEFROI [I] Comte de Namur, son of ALBERT [III] Comte de Namur & his wife Ida von Sachsen (-19 Aug 1139). 

2.             MATHILDE de Luxembourg (-after 1070).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensendis, specifying that Mathilde was "comitissam de Longui et de Homborc et de Castris" and that she was mother of "comitem Folmerum et sorores eius Helvidem, quam habuit comes Gerardus de Reneke dyocesis Herbipolensis et illam qua dux de Bronsviic genuit filiam, que in Sclavia hereditavit"[132]m GOTTFRIED [III] Graf im Bliesgau, son of FOLMAR [III] Comte de Metz & his wife Suanehilde --- (-1098 or after).  1075/98.

Graf Konrad & his [second] wife had five children: 

3.             HENRI de Luxembourg (-after 12 Apr 1095).  "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[133].  He succeeded his father in 1086 as HENRI III Comte de Luxembourg.  He made a peace treaty with the archbishop of Trier and supported the emperor in the investiture conflict[134]

4.             RUDOLF de Luxembourg .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Abbé de Saint-Vannes at Verdun 1075/99.  His brother installed him as abbot of Münster at Luxembourg after 1083[135]

5.             CONRAD de Luxembourg .  "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[136]

6.             GUILLAUME de Luxembourg (-[17 Jun 1129/31]).  "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[137]The Gesta Treverorum names "comite Willehelmo filio Cuonradi comitis de castello Lucelenburch"[138]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensendis[139].  "…Wilhelmus comes de Lutzelenburg cognate mei…" subscribed the charter dated 1093 under which "Heinricus…comes palatinus Rheni et dominus de Lacu…uxore mei Adleide" founded the abbey of Laach[140].  Vogt of Echternach 1096.  He succeeded his brother in [1096] as GUILLAUME I Comte de Luxembourg.  Richard de Grandpré, Bishop of Verdun, invested him in 1109 with the counties of Stenay and Mouzay, which had been confiscated by Heinrich IV King of Germany from Matilda Ctss of Tuscany in 1085 and were eventually ceded to the bishopric of Verdun[141].  Guillaume was excommunicated by Bruno Archbishop of Trier after appropriating land in 1111 from the monastery of St Maximin[142].  Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[143]m ([1105]) LUITGARD von Beichlingen, daughter of KUNO von Northeim Graf von Beichlingen & his wife Kunigunde von Orlamünde.  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Lutgardis" as wife of "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg" but does not give her origin[144].  The Annalista Saxo records (but does not name, except for the fourth daughter) the four daughters of Kuno & his wife, one of whom (listed second) married "Willehelmus comes de Licelenburh"[145].  Comte Guillaume I & his wife had three children: 

a)             CONRAD de Luxembourg (-1136).  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Conrardi" as son of "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg" & his wife[146].  He succeeded his father in [1129/31] as CONRAD II Comte de Luxembourgm (before 1134) as her second husband, ERMGARD van Zutphen, widow of GERHARD [II] Graaf van Gelderland, daughter of OTTO [II] "der Reiche" Graaf van Zutphen & his wife Judith ---.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.   Comte Conrad II & his wife had one child: 

i)               OTTO de Luxembourg .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Graf von Gleiberg 1141/62.

b)             LIUTGARD de Luxembourg (-before 1170).  The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the wife of "Henricus Waflart comes Grandi-prati" as "comitissam de Luceleburch"[147].  The Chronicon Hanoniense refers to "Willelmi comitis de Lusceleborch…filiam…uxor comes de Grandi-Prato" when recording that her first cousin "Henricus comes Namurcensis" challenged her succession in Luxembourg after her father died[148]m HENRI II Comte de Grandpré, son of HENRI [I] Comte de Grandpré, de Porcien et de Verdun & his wife Ermentrude de Joux [Grandson] (-[1188/90]).

c)             GUILLAUME de Luxembourg .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1131/58.  Graf von Gleiberg.  m SALOME von Isenburg, daughter of ---.  The primary source which confirms her origin and marriage has not yet been identified.  1155.  Graf Wilhelm & his wife had two children: 

i)               WILHELM von Gleiberg .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  1148/[1155].  

ii)             MECHTILD von Gleiberg (-12 Jan after 1203).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Gräfin von Giessen.  m (before 30 Jul 1181) RUDOLF [I] Pfalzgraf von Tübingen, son of HUGO [II] Pfalzgraf von Tübingen & his wife Elisabeth von Bregenz (-1219 after 1 Apr). 

7.             ADALBERT de Luxembourg (-killed Antioch 1097).  Archdeacon at Metz Cathedral.  Albert of Aix records "Adalberon son of Conrad de Lutzelbourg", cleric and archdeacon at Metz cathedral, playing dice with a noble lady in an orchard outside Antioch, where they were surprised by Turks who beheaded Adalbert, kidnapped the lady, and later catapulted their heads across the plain from the ramparts of the city[149].  

 

 

Chapter 2.    COMTES de LUXEMBOURG (NAMUR)

HENRI IV 1136-1196, ERMENSENDE 1198-1247

1.             HENRI de Namur, son of GODEFROI Comte de Namur & his second wife Ermesinde Ctss de Luxembourg (1111-14 Aug 1196, bur Abbaye de Floreffe).  The Chronicon Hanoniense names "Henricum…et Albertum qui iuvenis decessit" as the two sons of "Godefridus comes Namurcensi" & his second wife[150].  He succeeded in 1136 as HENRI IV Comte de Luxembourg.  He succeeded his father in 1139 as HENRI I "l'Aveugle" Comte de Namur, de la Roche, de Durbuy et de Longwy.  He marched against Adalberon Archbishop of Trier in 1141, was excommunicated and lost Luxembourg territory when the archbishop counter-attacked, although peace was finally signed in Speyer in 1146[151].  He also challenged the authority of the Bishop of Liège, attacking the château de Bouillon which the bishop claimed from the counts of Bar, but was defeated in 1151 at Andenne by the forces of Bishop Henri de Leyon[152].  He named his brother-in-law Baudouin IV Comte de Hainaut as his heir in Namur and Luxembourg, the latter's son Baudouin V assuming the position of designated successor after his father's death[153].  Comte Henri lost his sight in 1182[154].  After the unexpected birth of his daughter in 1186, Comte Henri revoked his assurance to Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut concerning the succession and betrothed the infant to Henri II Comte de Champagne.  In 1188, Comte Henri was obliged to reinstate Baudouin as his heir after a verdict in the latter's favour from Heinrich VI King of Germany.  Comte Baudouin attacked Namur, captured Comte Henri and obtained a confirmation of his position from Emperor Friedrich I who also secretly created him Marquis de Namur.  Under a compromise reached in 1190, Baudouin received Namur immediately, with the expectation of Laroche and Durbuy after the death of Henri who received the revenues of these two counties for life; the fate of Luxembourg was not mentioned.  The creation of the Marquisate of Namur was announced at Worms in 1190, at which time Comte Henri retired to Luxembourg where he continued to rule as count[155].  He made a last attempt to recover Namur in 1194 but was defeated at Noville-sur-Mehaigne[156]

a)             ERMENSENDE de Namur (Jul 1186-12 Feb 1247, bur Clairefontaine, near Arlon[157]).  The Chronicon Hanoniense records the birth in Jul 1186 of "Ermensendem" daughter of "comes Namurcensis Henricus" and his wife Agnes[158].  The Chronicon Hanoniense records the betrothal in 1187 of "Ermensendis" and "comiti Campanensi Henrico"[159].  Her first betrothal was arranged by Comte Henri in order to guarantee a suitably strong protector for his daughter in light of his dispute with Baudouin V Comte de Hainaut regarding the eventual succession to his counties, but the arrangement was discontinued after the 1190 imperial decision in favour of Comte Baudouin[160].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines in 1193 records the marriage of "Theobaldus comes Barrensis" and "filiam Henrici comitis ceci…Ermensendem"[161].  She succeeded her father in 1196 as ERMENSENDE Ctss de Luxembourg.  Her first husband bought the counties of Luxembourg, Durbuy and Laroche, with the approval of Philipp King of Germany, and besieged Philippe Marquis de Namur in his castle at Namur, which forced the negotiation of the 1199 treaty of Dinant[162].  Under the treaty, signed 26 Jul 1199, Baudouin IX Count of Flanders and Hainaut inherited Namur, while Ermesinde retained Luxembourg, Durbuy, Laroche and that part of Namur which lay on the right bank of the river Meuse[163]The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "seniori Walerano filio Henrici" as second husband of "Ermensende filia Henrici ceci comitis Namucensis"[164].  She received Arlon as her jointure on her second marriage[165]Betrothed (1187) to HENRI II Comte de Champagne, son of HENRI I "le Libéral" Comte de Champagne & his wife Marie de France (29 Jul 1166-Acre 10 Sep 1197).  m firstly (1197) as his third wife, THIBAUT I Comte de Bar, son of RENAUD II Comte de Bar & his wife Agnes de Blois ([1160]-12/13 Feb 1214, bur Saint-Mihiel).  m secondly ([Feb/May] 1214) as his second wife, WALERAN de Limbourg Seigneur de Montjoie, son of HENDRIK III Duke of Limburg & his wife Sophie von Saarbrücken (-Cremona 2 Jul 1226, bur Rode Abbey).  He succeeded in 1221 as WALERAN IV Duke of Limburg.    

 

 

Chapter 3.    COMTES de LUXEMBOURG 1237-1313 (LIMBURG-ARLON)

HENRI V 1237-1281

HENDRIK van Limburg, son of WALERAN IV Duke of Limburg & his second wife Ermensende Ctss de Luxembourg ([1216/17]-Mainz 24 Dec 1281, bur Clairefontaine).  On reaching the age of majority in 1237, he assumed the title Comte de Luxembourg, and succeeded his mother in 1247 as HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg.  He adopted the red lion of Limburg on a barred background as the arms of Luxembourg[166].  After his brother-in-law Thibaut II Comte de Bar seized Ligny in 1266, Comte Henri was defeated at Preny near Pont-à-Mousson 6 Sep 1266 and was captured and imprisoned at Mousson, although Ligny was restored after the mediation of Louis IX King of France[167].  He joined the crusade of King Louis in 1270 and, after the king's death, he was proposed as the expedition's new leader by Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet][168].  Comte Henri was allied with Gérard Seigneur de Durbuy and Jean Duke of Brabant, against Jean Bishop of Liège and Guy Count of Flanders, in the so-called "War of the Cow" from 1272 to 1276, when the death of a peasant convicted of stealing a cow triggered regional devastation[169]

m (contracts 1230[170] and 4 Jun 1240, 1246) MARGUERITE de Bar, daughter of HENRI II Comte de Bar & his wife Philippa de Dreux [Capet] (-23 Nov 1273, bur Clairefontaine).  Her dowry was the seigneurie of Ligny-en-Barrois[171]

Comte Henri V & his wife had six children: 

1.             HENRI de Luxembourg ([1250]-killed in battle Worringen 5 Jun 1288).  He succeeded his father in 1281 as HENRI VI Comte de Luxembourg, Durbuy, Laroche and Arlon. (below)

2.             WALERAN de Luxembourg (-killed in battle Worringen 5 Jun 1288).  Seigneur de Ligny-en-Barrois, de Roussy et de La Roche.   

-        SEIGNEURS de LIGNY, de ROUSSY et de LA ROCHE, COMTES de LIGNY.

3.             PHILIPPINE de Luxembourg ([1252]-6 Apr 1311).  The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the marriage of Count Jean and "Philippam filiam comitis Lucemburgie"[172]m ([1265]) JEAN II d´Avesnes, son of JEAN I Comte de Hainaut & his wife Aleide of Holland (1247-22 Aug 1304).  He succeeded in 1280 as JEAN II Comte de Hainaut, and in 1299 as JAN II Count of Holland

4.             ISABELLE de Luxembourg (-25 Sep 1298).  m (May 1264) as his second wife, GUY joint Count of Flanders, son of GUILLAUME II Seigneur de Dampierre & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders and Hainaut ([1225/26]-imprisoned Compiègne 7 Mar 1305, bur Flines).  He succeeded his mother in 1278 as sole Count of Flanders.  

5.             MARGUERITE de Luxembourg (-after 13 Jul 1302).  Frau von Grevenmacher. 

6.             JEANNE de Luxembourg (-1310 after 3 Jul).  Abbess of Clairefontaine 1297. 

Comte Henri V had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses: 

7.              HENRI bâtard de Luxembourg (-killed in battle Worringen 1288).  He supported his half-brother Henri VI Comte de Luxembourg against Jean Duke of Brabant and was killed in battle[173]m (before 1286) ISABELLE de Houffalize, daughter of ---.  Henri & his wife had one child: 

a)              BEATRIX de Luxembourg (-[1321]).  Heiress of Houffalize.  m (before 5 Apr 1297) GERARD de Grandpré Seigneur de Roussy.

8.              BAUDOUIN [Jean] bâtard de Luxembourg .  He supported his half-brother Henri VI Comte de Luxembourg against Jean Duke of Brabant at the battle of Worringen[174]

9.              RAOUL bâtard de Luxembourg (-[1366/68]).  Seigneur de la Tour-Devant-Virton.  m SOPHIE de Chasteler, daughter of ---.  Raoul & his wife had one child: 

a)              CLEMENCE de Luxembourgm firstly (1369) JOSSE d'Aspremont Seigneur de Saulmoury et de la Tour-devant-Virton .  m secondly ([1374/76]) GILLES bâtard de Luxembourg, son of WENZEL of Bohemia Duke of Luxembourg, Brabant and Limburg & his mistress --- (-1404 or after).  m thirdly HUET de Jametz

 

HENRI VI 1281-1288

HENRI de Luxembourg, son of HENRI V "le Blond" Comte de Luxembourg & his wife Marguerite de Bar ([1250]-killed in battle Worringen 5 Jun 1288).  He succeeded his father in 1281 as HENRI VI Comte de Luxembourg, Durbuy, Laroche and Arlon.  He captured the Bishop of Liège in the Bouillon forest and imprisoned him in Luxembourg castle[175].  He was also in dispute with the Archbishop of Trier after imposing new tolls on Trier inhabitants trading on the Moselle, and was excommunicated[176].  Comte Henri bought the duchy of Limburg from Reinald Graaf van Gelderland for 40,000 marks.  Supporters of the other claimant, Jean Duke of Brabant who had bought his claim from Adolf V Graf von Berg, captured Worringen and battle ensued during which Comte Henri challenged Duke Jean to single combat in which he was killed[177]

m (before 22 May 1265) BEATRIX d'Avesnes, daughter of BAUDOUIN Seigneur d'Avesnes Seigneur de Beaumont & his second wife Félicité de Coucy (-Abbaye de Beaumont, Valenciennes 25 Feb 1321, bur Abbaye de Beaumont).  She was heiress of the seigneuries of Dourlers and Consorres[178].  She was regent of Luxembourg 1288-1295, during the minority of her son, after which she retired to Valenciennes[179]

Comte Henri VI & his wife had five children: 

1.             HENRI de Luxembourg (Valenciennes 12 Jul 1274-Buonconvento, near Siena 24 Aug 1313, bur Pisa Cathedral).  He succeeded his father in 1288 as HENRI VII Comte de Luxembourg, under the regency of his mother until 1295.  He was elected HEINRICH IX King of Germany in 1308. (below)

2.             WALERAN de Luxembourg (-Brescia 21 Jul 1311, bur Verona Santa Anastasia).  Seigneur de Dourlers, de Thirimont et de Consorre.

3.             MARGUERITE de Luxembourg (-Trier 14 Feb 1336).  Nun at Lille 1294.  Prioress of Marienthal 1301/1314. 

4.             FELICITEE de Luxembourg (-Beaumont Priory, near Valenciennes 6 Oct [1336], bur Beaumont Priory).  Nun at Beaumont Priory, near Valenciennes 1312, later Prioress.  m (contract Brussels 4 Oct 1298) JEAN "Tristan" de Louvain Heer van Gaesbeek, son of HENRI de Louvain Heer van Gaesbeck, Herstal en Baucignies & his wife Isabel van Beveren (-[8 Feb 1309/17 Jun 1311], bur Brussels Franciscan Church). 

5.             BAUDOUIN de Luxembourg (Autumn 1285-Trier 21 Jan 1354, bur Trier Cathedral).  Canon at Mainz Cathedral to 1308.  Canon at Trier Cathedral, provost before 1304.  Postulate at Mainz 1305/1306, his election as archbishop was opposed by Pope Clement[180].  Elected Archbishop of Trier 7 Dec 1307, installed as Archbishop and Elector of Trier 1308.  The Annales Lubicenses record the election of "comes Hinricus de Luczelenborch fratre suo" as archbishop of Trier in 1308[181].  Administrator of the Bishopric of Worms 1309/1310 and 1336/1337.  In 1310 he organised a provincial synod at Trier which pronounced against witchcraft, magic and astrology[182].  Elected Bishop of Mainz 1328/1336, later administrator of the Bishopric of Mainz.  Administrator of the Bishopric of Speyer 1331/1337. 

 

HENRI VII 1288-1313

HENRI de Luxembourg, son of HENRI VI Comte de Luxembourg & his wife Béatrice d'Avesnes (Valenciennes 12 Jul 1274-Buonconvento, near Siena 24 Aug 1313, bur Pisa Cathedral).  He succeeded his father in 1288 as HENRI VII Comte de Luxembourg, under the regency of his mother until 1295.  He became a vassal of France in 1294, despite his existing feudal relationship with the empire[183].  He was elected HEINRICH IX King of Germany[184] at Frankfurt-am-Main 27 Nov 1308, with the support especially of Peter von Aspelt Archbishop of Mainz and his brother Baudouin de Luxembourg Archbishop of Trier[185], crowned at Aachen 6 Jan 1309.  He appointed Gilles von Rodemachern as governor of Luxembourg[186].  He launched his ill-fated Italian expedition in late 1310, was crowned king of Italy at Milan 6 Jan 1311.  The cities of Florence, Lucca and Brescia refused him entry[187].  He entered Rome in Jun 1312 but was opposed by Jean of Sicily, brother of King Robert.  He was eventually crowned Emperor HEINRICH VI at the Lateran 29 Jun 1312, although only a small part of the ceremonial could be completed because of the disturbances[188].  He allied himself with Federigo King of Sicily [Aragon] and prepared an expedition against Naples[189].  He died of "marsh fever" near Siena[190], although a rumour circulated that he had been poisoned by his Dominican confessor during mass[191]

m (Tervueren 9 Jun 1292) MARGUERITE de Brabant, daughter of JEAN I Duke of Brabant & his second wife Marguerite de Flandre (4 Oct 1276-Genoa 14 Dec 1311, bur Pisa Cathedral).  The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata names (in order) "Mariam comitissam Sabaudie et Montium, et Margaretam [uxor] Henricus comes de Lusseleborch" as the two daughters of "Iohannes dux Lothoringie et Brabantie" & his second wife[192].  This marriage was arranged to settle the long-standing dispute with the Duke of Brabant over the duchy of Limburg, her husband abandoning his claim to Limburg at the same time[193].  She died of plague[194]

Betrothed (1313) to [KATHARINA] von Habsburg, daughter of ALBRECHT I King of Germany, Duke of Austria & his wife Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol (Oct 1295-Naples 18 Jan 1323, bur Naples San Lorenzo Maggiore).  The Chronicon Elwacense records the betrothal of "soror ducum Austriæ" and "imperatori Hainrico", specifying that the marriage did not take place because of the Emperor's death[195].  It is not known to which sister of Duke Friedrich this refers.  However, his older sister Agnes was probably too old and may have been too actively involved in the government of Austria to have been allowed to leave in order to marry.  His youngest sister Jutta was probably too young.  This leaves Katharina as the most likely candidate, immediately after the termination of her betrothal to the Lord of Piemonte. 

Emperor Heinrich & his wife had three children: 

1.             JEAN de Luxembourg (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame).  He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311.  He succeeded his father in 1313 as JEAN Comte de Luxembourg, but confided the government of the county to his uncle Baudouin Archbishop of Trier[196]. (below)

2.             MARIE de Luxembourg (1305-Issoudun, Indre Mar 1324, bur Montargis, Loiret, église des religieuses de Saint-Dominique).  Consecrated Queen of France at Paris Sainte-Chapelle 15 May 1323.  She died in childbirth after falling out of the bottom of the coach which was driving her and her husband to a meeting with the Pope in Avignon[197]m (Provins, Seine-et-Marne 21 Sep 1322) as his second wife, CHARLES IV King of France, son of PHILIPPE IV King of France & his wife Juana I Queen of Navarre (Creil, Oise 18 Jun 1294-Château du Bois de Vincennes 1 Feb 1328, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).   

3.             BEATRIX de Luxembourg (1305-Timişoara, Romania Nov 1319, bur Varazdin Cathedral, Croatia).  She died after childbirth.  m ([24 Jun/Sep] 1318) as his second wife, KÁROLY I King of Hungary, son of CHARLES MARTEL of Sicily, Principe di Salerno, KÁROLY I titular King of Hungary & his wife Klementia von Habsburg (1288-Visegrad 16 Jul or 15 Aug 1342, bur Székesfehérvár).

 

JEAN 1313-1346, CHARLES 1346-1353, WENZEL I 1353-1383, WENZEL II 1383-1419, [JOBST 1388-1402, ELISABETH 1411-1441], SIGISMOND 1419-1437

JEAN de Luxembourg, son of HENRI VII Comte de Luxembourg [later Emperor HEINRICH, King of Germany] & his wife Marguerite de Brabant (Château de Luxembourg 10 Aug 1296-killed in battle Crécy 26 Aug 1346, bur Abbaye de Valloire, transferred to Münster Abbey, transferred 25 Aug 1946 to Luxembourg, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame).  He was elected JAN King of Bohemia at Speyer 30 Aug 1310, crowned 7 Feb 1311.  He succeeded his father in 1313 as JEAN Comte de Luxembourg, but confided the government of the county to his uncle Baudouin Archbishop of Trier[198]

m firstly (Speyer 30 Aug 1310) ELISKA [Elisabeth] of Bohemia, daughter of WENZEL II King of Bohemia & his first wife Guta of Austria [Habsburg] (Prague 20 Jan 1292-Wyšehrad 28 Sep 1330, bur Königsaal).  This marriage was arranged by Jean's father as a means of accumulating power within the kingdom of Germany after his election to the German throne[199]

m secondly (contract Bois-de-Vincennes Dec 1334, dispensation 3o Avignon 9 Jan 1335) as her first husband, BEATRICE de Bourbon, daughter of LOUIS de Clermont Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis ([1320]-Danvillers 15 Dec 1383, bur Paris église des Jacobins).  She married secondly ([1347]) Eudes [VI] Sire de Grancey et de Pierrepont (-27 Jul 1389). 

King Jan & his first wife had seven children:

1.             other children: see BOHEMIA

2.             WENZEL of Bohemia (Prague 14 May 1316-Prague 29 Nov 1378, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  He adopted the name KARL at his confirmation in Paris in 1323[200].  Elected KARL IV King of Germany in 1346.  He succeeded his father in 1346 as KARL King of Bohemia, and as CHARLES Comte de Luxembourg despite his father having bequeathed the county to his younger half-brother Wenzel, in whose favour he resigned it in 1353[201].    Crowned Emperor KARL IV at Rome 5 Apr 1355. 

a)             WENZEL of Bohemia (Nürnberg 26 Feb 1361-Schloß Konratitz 16 Aug 1419, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  Crowned as WENZEL IV King of Bohemia 15 Jun 1363, during the lifetime of his father.  He succeeded in 1373 as WENZEL II Elector of Brandenburg, until 1378.  Elected WENZEL King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 10 Jun 1376, crowned at Aachen 21 Jul 1376.  He succeeded his uncle in 1383 as WENZEL II Duc de Luxembourg et Comte de Chiny.  He appointed his brother Johann as lieutenant governor of Luxembourg and Chiny in 1386, and mortgaged Luxembourg to his cousin Jobst Markgraf of Moravia in 1388, the mortgage being transferred in 1402 to Louis Duc d'Orléans and in 1409 to his niece Elisabeth Hgn von Görlitz on her marriage to Antoine Duke of Brabant[202].  Deposed as King of Germany at Bacharach 24 Mar 1400.  A well-known drunkard, he died of an apoplectic fit[203]

b)             SIGMUND of Bohemia (Prague 28 Jun 1368-Znaim/Znojmo 9 Dec 1437, bur Cathedral of Grosswardein/Szarvas, Hungary).  He succeeded in 1378 as SIGMUND Markgraf von Brandenburg until 1395, when he was obliged to pawn the territory to his cousin Jobst, and again after the death of Jobst in 1411 until 1415.  He was elected ZSIGMOND King of Hungary in 1386.  He succeeded his younger brother Johann in 1396 in Neumark und Lausitz, territories which he sold to the Knights of the Teutonic Order in 1402[204].  Elected SIGMUND King of Germany at Frankfurt-am-Main 14 Sep 1410, supported by Brandenburg, Trier and Palatinate, in opposition to his cousin Jobst[205].  Following the death of Jobst in early 1411, Sigmund's election was confirmed 21 Jul 1411.  He was crowned at Aachen 8 Nov 1414.  Elected ZIKMUND King of Bohemia at Hradschin 28 Jul 1410, crowned at Prague 27 Jul 1420 after the death of his older half-brother King Wenzel IV.  He disputed the possession of Luxembourg by his niece Elisabeth Herzogin von Görlitz and her husband Antoine Duke of Brabant in 1412, and appointed Huart d'Autel as his lieutenant governor[206], when he also succeeded as SIGISMOND Duc de Luxembourg.  Crowned King of Italy at Milan 25 Nov 1431.  Crowned Emperor SIGMUND at Rome 31 May 1433.  He designated his son-in-law as his successor in both Hungary and Bohemia. 

c)             JOHANN of Bohemia (Prague 22 Jun 1370-Kloster Neuzelle 1 Mar 1396, bur Prague Cathedral St Veit).  Herzog von Görlitz.  He succeeded his brother in 1378 as JOHANN Markgraf of Brandenburg, in der Neumark und Lausitz.  His brother Wenzel appointed him lieutenant governor in Luxembourg and Chiny in 1386[207]m (Prague 10 Feb 1388) RICHARDIS von Mecklenburg, daughter of ALBRECHT III Herzog von Mecklenburg ex-King of Sweden & his first wife Richardis von Schwerin (-after 15 Mar 1400). 

i)               ELISABETH de Luxembourg (Horsewitz Nov 1390-Trier 3 Aug 1451, bur Trier Minoritenkirche).  Herzogin von Görlitz.  In 1409, her uncle Wenzel transferred to her the mortgage over the duchy of Luxembourg and county of Chiny, and gave her the right to the title, on the occasion of her first marriage[208].  The representatives of Luxembourg, except the nobility, acknowledged them as their "mortgage rulers/souverains engagistes" at Arlon 15 Dec 1410[209].  She and her husband took possession of Luxembourg in 1412 and succeeded as ELISABETH Dss de Luxembourg, Ctss de Chiny.  Her uncle King Sigmund forbade Luxembourg from paying homage to her and her husband, but he was forced to confirm her position after his own succession in Luxembourg in 1419 after his brother Wenzel died, as he was unable to redeem the pledge[210].  She sold her rights as engagiste to Philippe Duke of Burgundy in 1441[211]m firstly (contract 27 Apr 1409, Brussels 16 Jul 1409) ANTOINE de Bourgogne Duke of Brabant and Limburg, son of PHILIPPE II "le Hardi" Duke of Burgundy & his wife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders (Aug 1384-killed in battle Agincourt 25 Oct 1415, bur Tervueren St Jan).  m secondly (dispensation 6 May 1418, Jun 1418) JOHANN III Duke of Bavaria-Straubing, JAN III Count of Holland and Zeeland, JEAN Comte de Hainaut, son of ALBRECHT Duke of Bavaria-Straubing [ALBERT Comte de Hainaut, Count of Holland] & his first wife Margareta von Brieg [Piast] (1376-6 Jan 1425, bur The Hague St Vincenz). 

3.             JOHANN HEINRICH of Bohemia (Melnik 12 Feb 1322-12 Nov 1375, bur Brno Kloster St Thomas).  Markgraf of Moravia 1349. 

a)             JODOK [Jobst] (1354-Spielberg near Brno 18 Jan 1411, bur Brno St Thomas).  He succeeded his father in 1375 as Markgraf of Moravia.  He succeeded in 1388 as JOBST Markgraf von Brandenburg.  His cousin Wenzel mortgaged Luxembourg to Jobst in 1388, the mortgage being transferred in 1402 to Louis Duc d'Orléans and in 1409 to his Wenzel's Elisabeth Hgn von Görlitz[212].  Regent of Bohemia 1394.  He was elected JOBST King of Germany in 1410, supported by Mainz, Köln, Saxony and Bohemia, in opposition to his cousin Sigmund[213].   

King Jan & his second wife had one child: 

4.             WENZEL de Luxembourg (Prague 25 Feb 1337-Bock castle, Luxembourg 8 Dec 1383).  He succeeded in 1353 as WENZEL I Comte de Luxembourg, after his half-brother King Karl resigned the county in his favour.  He became Duke of Luxembourg when the county was elevated into a duchy by his brother at Metz 13 Mar 1354[214].  He succeeded in 1355 as Duke of Brabant and Limburg, and Markgraaf van Antwerpen, by right of his wife, after which he established his court in Brussels[215].  He purchased the county of Chiny in 1364 for 16,000 gold gulden, and was named Governor of Alsace by his half-brother Emperor Karl IV[216].  After initiating negotiations with his brother concerning the latter's eventual inheritance of the childless Wenzel's properties, Louis Count of Flanders occupied Mechelen and Duke Wenzel was forced to flee to Limburg.  The dispute was settled by the peace of Ath under which Mechelen and Antwerp were transferred to Flanders, and Count Louis was granted the right to bear the title Duke of Brabant[217].  Duke Wenzel attacked Jülich, accusing it of giving protection to robber gangs, but Wenzel was captured at Bauweiler and imprisoned for one year until ransomed[218].  He died of leprosy[219][220]Betrothed (13 Dec 1337, contract broken 3 Jul 1346) to MARGUERITE de Lorraine, daughter of FERRY IV Duke of Lorraine & his wife Elisabeth von Habsburg (-after 9 Aug 1376).  m (contract Damvillers 17 May 1351, dispensation 3o Avignon 8 Aug 1351, Mar 1352) as her second husband, JEANNE de Brabant, daughter of JEAN III Duke of Brabant & his wife Marie d'Evreux (24 Jun 1322-Brussels 1 Dec 1406, bur Brussels Carmelite Church).  She succeeded her father in 1355 as JEANNE Duchess of Brabant and Limburg.  Duke Wenzel had four illegitimate children by an unknown mistress: 

a)              GILLES bâtard de Luxembourg .  1374/1404.  Seigneur de la Tour-devant-Virton et de Saulmoury, in right of his wife.  Governor of Aspremont.  m ([1374/76]) as her second husband, CLEMENCE de Luxembourg, widow of JOSSE d'Aspremont Seigneur de Saulmoury et de la Tour-devant-Virton, daughter of RAOUL bâtard de Luxembourg & his wife Sophie du Chasteler.  She married thirdly Huet de Jametz.  Gilles & his wife had four children: 

i)               MARGUERITE de Latour (-before 19 Dec 1424).  m ([21 Sep 1396]) ROBERT Seigneur de Watrouville (-before 19 Dec 1424). 

ii)              RAOUL de Latour .  1402/24.

iii)            WENCELIN de Latour (-before 19 Dec 1444).  Seigneur de la Tour-devant-Virton et de Conflans.  Adviser to the Dukedom of Bar 1418.  Bailli de Saint-Mihiel 1419.  French councillor.  Bailli de Vitry.  m (shortly after 3 Sep 1408) CATHERINE de Lénoncourt, daughter of JEAN de Lénoncourt & his wife Lise ---.  Wencelin & his wife had one child:   

(a)            CATHERINE de Latour .  1432/61.  Heiress of la Tour-devant-Virton.  m (before 1432) HEINRICH Bayer von Boppard Seigneur de Château-Brehain [Bruch-Kastel] (-[10 Jun 1458/20 Jun 1462]).  Seigneur de la Tour-devant-Virton. 

iv)             HENRI de Latour .  1409/57.  m JEANNE de Lénoncourt, daughter of ---.   

b)              GUILLAUME bâtard de Luxembourg .  Bailli de Hannut 1405.  

c)              JEAN bâtard de Luxembourg .  1395/1405.  m (before 7 Mar 1405) MARIE Mennens, daughter of ---.  

d)              CHARLES bâtard de Luxembourgm (after 1411) JOHANNA van der Spout, daughter of BERNARDUS van der Spout & his wife Margareta van der Hulpen bâtarde de Brabant.  1383/1411. 

 

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Resources
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[2] Murray (2000), pp. 23-5. 
[3] Gade, p. 103. 
[4] Gade, p. 115. 
[5] Gade, p. 220. 
[6] Gade, p. 216 footnote 1. 
[7] Gerbert 52, p. 48, and Epistola XXXV, RCGF 9, p. 283. 
[8] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 179, p. 241. 
[9] Gade, p. 49. 
[10] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 211, p. 271. 
[11] Gade, p. 50. 
[12] D O I 427, p. 580. 
[13] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 255, p. 311. 
[14] Richer III.CIII, p. 126. 
[15] Gade, p. 51. 
[16] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791. 
[17] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[18] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 269. 
[19] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 220, p. 278. 
[20] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 268, p. 324. 
[21] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791. 
[22] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[23] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 220, p. 278. 
[24] AS 1002. 
[25] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1008, MHG SS V, p. 119. 
[26] Gade, p. 53. This brother Adalbert is not given in . 
[27] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 269, p. 325. 
[28] Thietmar 8.18, p. 374. 
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[30] Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ 1026, MGH SS XXV, p. 627. 
[31] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[32] Thietmar 6.19, p. 250. 
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[36] Beka's Egmondsch Necrologium, in Oppermann, O. (1933) Fontes Egmundenses (Utrecht), p. 106. 
[37] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791. 
[38] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1008, MHG SS V, p. 119. 
[39] AS 1002. 
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[42] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[43] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791. 
[44] AS 1002. 
[45] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.1, p. 95. 
[46] Thietmar 5.19, p. 218. 
[47] Annales Herbipolenses minores 1038, MGH SS XXIV, p. 828. 
[48] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301. 
[49] Attwater, p. 167. 
[50] Jackman, Luxembourg. 
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[55] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1008, MHG SS V, p. 119. 
[56] Thietmar 6.35, p. 261. 
[57] Vita Meinwerci Episcopi Paderbornensis 142, MGH SS XI, p. 135. 
[58] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 308, I, p. 360. 
[59] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 308, III, p. 362. 
[60] Guichenon, S. (1660) Bibliotheca Sebusiana (Lyon), p. 393, quoted in Hlawitschka 1969, p. 88. 
[61] Thietmar 7.62, p. 352. 
[62] D H III 55, p. 72. 
[63] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[64] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[65] Vitæ Heinrici et Cunegundis Imperatores Preface, MGH SS IV, p. 791. 
[66] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 257, p. 314. 
[67] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[68] Vita Sanctæ Cunegundis I, MHG SS IV, p. 821, addition quoted in footnote v. 
[69] MGH Diplomata III, D H II 346, p. 440. 
[70] Necrologium Trunckirchense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 426. 
[71] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 273, p. 328. 
[72] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 1008, MHG SS V, p. 119. 
[73] Annales Quedlinburgenses 1019, MGH SS III, p. 84. 
[74] Vita Adelheidis abbatissæ Vilicensis 3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 757. 
[75] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[76] Gade, p. 54. 
[77] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses 957, MGH SS XIII, p. 198. 
[78] Historia Episcoporum Pataviensium et Ducum Bavariæ 1048, MGH SS XXV, p. 627. 
[79] Necrologium Genealogicum Ranshofense, Passau Necrologies I, p. 424. 
[80] Vita Adelheidis abbatissæ Vilicensis 3, MGH SS XV.2, p. 757. 
[81] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 308, p. 360. 
[82] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 4, MGH SS XXV, p. 383. 
[83] Chronicon Sancti Huberti Andaginensis 17 (24), MHG SS VIII, p. 577. Although this passage is not dated, the editor has placed "c 1066" in the margin. 
[84] Genealogia ex stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 7, MGH SS XXV, p. 384. 
[85] Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi descendentium Mettensis 4, MGH SS XXV, p. 383. 
[86] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1064, MGH SS XXIII, p. 794. 
[87] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1048, MGH SS X, p. 384. 
[88] Gestorum Abbatem Trudonensium Continuatio Tertia 1060 and 1063, MGH SS X, p. 385. 
[89] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 308, p. 360. 
[90] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 306, p. 358. 
[91] Gade, p. 55. 
[92] Gade, pp. 54-5. 
[93] Gade, p. 55. 
[94] Gade, p. 55. 
[95] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782. 
[96] AS 1040. 
[97] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 308, p. 360. 
[98] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 367, p. 424. 
[99] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 367, p. 424. 
[100] MGH Diplomata VI.2, D H IV 394, p. 521. 
[101] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 388, p. 444. 
[102] Mariani Scotti Chronicon, Continuatio I, 1085, MGH SS V, p. 562. 
[103] AS 1062. 
[104] AS 1100. 
[105] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis II 1092, MGH SS VIII, p. 473. 
[106] Grote, p. 51. 
[107] Grote, p. 51. 
[108] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306. 
[109] ES I.2 203. 
[110] Annales Blandinienses 1030, MGH SS V, p. 26. 
[111] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299. 
[112] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299, footnote 36 stating she was "Schwester der Odgiva, vgl. de Budt S. 274". 
[113] Genealogia Welforum 7, MGH SS XIII, p. 734, footnote 20 interpreting the first place as "Möhring" near Friedberg in Bavaria. 
[114] Jordan, pp. 3-4. 
[115] Fundatio Ecclesiæ Sancti Georgii Lunarensis, MGH SS XV.2, p. 982. 
[116] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1024, MGH SS XXIII, p. 782. 
[117] Gade, pp. 55-6. 
[118] Gade, p. 56. 
[119] Gade, pp. 57. 
[120] Gade, pp. 56-7. 
[121] Bernoldi Chronicon 1086, MGH SS V, p. 445. 
[122] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[123] Vanderkindere II, p. 357, quoting Bertholot, III, pr. XXXV. 
[124] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 465a, p. 524. 
[125] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 465b, p. 524. 
[126] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Berthe, reine d'Aragon', p. 386 footnote 40. 
[127] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[128] Verdun Sainte-Vanne, 1902, LXXVI, p. 98. 
[129] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 465a, p. 524. 
[130] Marcigny-sur-Loire 176, p. 105. 
[131] Necrology Verdun Saint-Vanne, p. 142. 
[132] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[133] Vanderkindere II, p. 357, quoting Bertholot, III, pr. XXXV. 
[134] Gade, p. 58. 
[135] Gade, p. 56. 
[136] Vanderkindere II, p. 357, quoting Bertholot, III, pr. XXXV. 
[137] Vanderkindere II, p. 357, quoting Bertholot, III, pr. XXXV. 
[138] Gesta Treverorum 24, 1122, MGH SS VIII, p. . 
[139] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[140] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 388, p. 444. 
[141] Poull (1994), p. 90. 
[142] Gade, p. 59. 
[143] Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch 465a, p. 524. 
[144] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[145] AS 1103. 
[146] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1168, MGH SS XXIII, p. 851. 
[147] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 19, MGH SS XIII, p. 256. 
[148] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 508. 
[149] AA I.III, p. 159. 
[150] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 508. 
[151] Gade, pp. 88-9. 
[152] Gade, pp. 87-8. 
[153] Gade, p. 64. 
[154] Gade, p. 65. 
[155] Gade, pp. 66-. 
[156] Gade, p. 69. 
[157] Gade, p. 85. 
[158] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 550. 
[159] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, p. 552. 
[160] Gade, pp. 66 and 68. 
[161] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1193, MGH SS XXIII, p. 870. 
[162] Gade, p. 74. 
[163] Gade, p. 74. 
[164] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1214, MGH SS XXIII, p. 899. 
[165] Gade, p. 76. 
[166] Gade, p. 97. 
[167] Gade, p. 98. 
[168] Gade, p. 100. 
[169] Gade, p. 101. 
[170] Gade, p. 96. 
[171] Gade, p. 96. 
[172] Chronologia Johannes de Beke 78a, p. 255. 
[173] Gade, p. 106. 
[174] Gade, p. 106. 
[175] Gade, pp. 103-4. 
[176] Gade, pp. 104-5. 
[177] Gade, pp. 105-7. 
[178] Gade, p. 103. 
[179] Gade, p. 110. 
[180] Gade, p. 126. 
[181] Annales Lubicenses 1308, MGH SS XVI, p. 420. 
[182] Leuschner, p. 103. 
[183] Gade, p. 115. 
[184] The numbering depends on whether Heinrich Raspe Landgraf of Thuringia was recognised as Heinrich VIII King of Germany. 
[185] Gade, pp. 123-8. 
[186] Gade, p. 129. 
[187] Gade, p. 132. 
[188] Leuschner, pp. 106-7. 
[189] Leuschner, p. 107. 
[190] Gade, p. 133. 
[191] Leuschner, p. 107. 
[192] Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Ampliata 14, MGH SS XXV, p. 397. 
[193] Gade, p. 110. 
[194] Gade, p. 133. 
[195] ; Chronicon Elwacense 1314, MGH SS X, p. 39. 
[196] Gade, p. 136. 
[197] Gade, p. 140. 
[198] Gade, p. 136. 
[199] Leuschner, p. 104. 
[200] Leuschner, p. 149. 
[201] Gade, pp. 167 and 171. 
[202] Gade, pp. 194-5. 
[203] Gade, pp. 196-7. 
[204] Grote, p. 224. 
[205] Gade, p. 201. 
[206] Gade, p. 196. 
[207] Gade, p. 195. 
[208] Gade, pp. 195 and 209. 
[209] Gade, p. 196. 
[210] Gade, pp. 196 and 205. 
[211] Gade, p. 213. 
[212] Gade, pp. 194-5. 
[213] Gade, p. 201. 
[214] Gade, pp. 171-2. 
[215] Gade, p. 180. 
[216] Gade, p. 180. 
[217] Gade, p. 181. 
[218] Gade, pp. 181-2. 
[219] Gade, p. 185. 
[220] Poull (1991), p. 102.